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Amateur Radio Starter Kit
radio : by Tommy - September 26th 2016, 07:16PM
I recently posted on Facebook for some friends about an incredibly cheap radio out of China. It's the Baofeng UV-5R.
The little dual-band radio has been the source of much consternation among the old guard of amateur radio because of it's cheap construction, low quality display, and some technical problems with the radio (some which make it technically illegal to operate on some frequencies). However, it is 100% legal to operate on the 2m amateur band (144-148MHz). The price of this radio is what makes all shortcomings able to be overlooked. It costs $25 on Amazon with free shipping for Prime customers!

Now, the radio is not a super great radio, but it's a phenomenal starter radio. (Or, as I call the one I keep in my car, a "burner" radio. I can drop it, lose it, or have it stolen and I simply would not care.) If one were to purchase this little capable radio for the mere $25 price tag, one should also get a couple of pieces of kit that should be standard: a better after-market antenna (Option 1 or Option 2) and a USB programming cable in order to program all the frequencies of nearby repeaters using software like CHiRP. All in, the whole kit still comes in around $40 which is still a fraction of the cost of a dual band radio from one of the major amateur radio manufacturers like Icom, Kenwood, or Yaesu.

Study, study
Anyone interested in amateur radio should consider studying for their license before dropping any money on a radio. While the radio is cheap, it's still money wasted if you can't use it because you don't have a license. The student guide's I most often recommend are the Technician study guide by Gordon West, WB6NOA, or the Technician study guide by the ARRL.

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tags: ham_radio license radio

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CW Works
radio : by Tommy - February 16th 2016, 04:32PM
I posted earlier about my new MountainTopper Radio. They're only being made and sold in small batches so I was never able to get my hands on one until January 2016. When I visited the site and saw they were for sale, I jumped at the opportunity to secure one of the little radios and it arrived a couple of weeks later. I had a business trip to go on so I wasn't able to fully get to know the radio until I got home. After I got home, the following Monday I got on the radio with the manual open on my computer. I got a feel for all the features packed into the limited number of buttons. After a while I really got the hang of it.
The next night (Tuesday) was a NAQCC Weeknight Sprint (a mini 2-hr radio contest) and it was also a night when class was cancelled. The 40m band was in pretty decent condition that night and I easily nabbed 5 different states. At the conclusion of the contest I made a couple more contacts and decided I loved the little radio. I've been using it nightly for the past week, making at least one QRP CW contact each day ...and that's where I've learned something.

It's something I heard guys say over and over again and, like you reading this, I've seen others write about: CW Works.

It's not just some old geezer claiming his tastes/choice mode is superior. What I mean to say is when the bands are great or incredibly noisy, CW still gets through. To modify the slogan "When all else fails... CW". Sure, digital modes get through when conditions are equally rough. (I first learned that late at night during Field Day one year using PSK31.

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tags: ham radio cw

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MountainTopper Radio
radio : by Tommy - February 16th 2016, 10:25AM
It's been quite a while since I last made a post but this is one I have to mark the occassion for. For the better part of the past 6 months I've had my eye on the MountainTopper Radio. It's a small QRP CW radio designed by Steve Weber, KD1JV, and sold by LNR Precision. The model I got is the 3-band version. (At the time of this writing there are rumors stirring about an upcoming 5-band version. Since I'm really only active on 40m and 20m, I'll pass on the 5 band model.)

The radio is very small - about the size of a deck of cards. There's no internal antenna tuner or battery. The volume, RF gain, and filter settings are fixed so there's no need for adjustment knobs. Nor is there a tuning knob. Tuning is done by two push buttons (UP and DOWN) that nudge the VFO up or down 50Hz. Holding down the button will change the frequency in 100Hz steps at a rate of 10 steps per second.
The elimination of knobs on the face of the radio allows the radio to pack very small. It's so small in fact, I was moved to get a Micro key from KK5PY. It has to be the smallest paddles I've ever used. To match the small size, the MTR can be powered by a 9V battery or a small 12V LiPo battery pack. Pack in some earbuds, a wire antenna, and a paper logbook and the whole kit fits into a small padded, zippered case ready to go. It's a radio meant for travel! I can't wait to take it on the road with me.
I've been using it to make QRP CW contacts each day for the past week and I'm going to try to get QRP Worked All States on 40m CW.

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tags: ham radio qrp cw

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WebSDR on Raspberry Pi
radio : by Tommy - August 10th 2015, 05:12PM
In Fall 2014, I setup my first Raspberry Pi WebSDR receiver for the 40m amateur radio band. In late July 2015, the Raspberry Pi stopped working at all. Once I hooked a monitor up to it, I learned the SD card had been corrupted. I'm now in the process of rebuilding the receiver and will be updating the steps required to setup this project on my project page.
The receiver hardware itself is fine and operational, it is only the WebSDR host (Raspberry Pi) that is out of commission.

For now the WebSDR and ISS iGate must connect to my home network via a wireless link from my ham shack behind my house. I'm in the process of digging a trench to run a network connection out to the shack so I don't have to wrestle with spotty wifi coverage. I'm going to be running fiber optic for the main run for reason I'll explain that in an upcoming post.

tags: raspberrypi ham radio raspi linux

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Raspberry Pi TNC ISS iGate
radio : by Tommy - April 8th 2014, 02:04PM
Not so long ago I completed construction of my Raspberry Pi TNC, the TNCPi. Construction of this kit was very straight forward. A few additional pictures would have made this a great kit for beginners, but still the same it's an easy build.

Building Tips
A couple of items to note regarding construction. Ensure the correct polarity of the electrolytic capacitor (C1): The negative stripe goes toward C15.
The transistor (Q1) PN2222's flat side goes away from the edge of the board.
The voltage regulator (U1) MCP1700's flat edge goes toward the edge of the board.
Crystal X2 (20MHz) is near U1. Crystal X1 (3.57MHz) is neat Q1.
Note the pin 1 position of all ICs.

Interface cable
After completing assembly of the TNC, I set to work on creating a radio interface cable to connect to the DB9 port on the TNCpi.

The pinout for the TNC Pi matches the TinyTrak cabling:
Pin 1TX Audio
Pin 3PTT
Pin 5RX Audio
Pin 6Ground

Tuning Audio Output
After creating the cable, I set the audio output level as noted in the instructions. To do this, you'll need two radios. I used 2 HTs, one that I had created the interface cable for and a spare. Tune the radios to the same frequency (I used 144.44). On the radio with the interface cable, I pressed the PTT button and heard a tone being transmitted to the neighboring radio. Adjust R7 to it's maximum volume before it begins to distort.

After tuning the audio, the TNC Pi project is complete. How you plan to implement the TNC Pi is entirely up to the software you choose. For many, this may be Xastir for an APRS GUI. For others, it may be aprx to create an APRS beacon, iGate, digipeater or any combination of the three.

tags: raspi aprs ariss iss tnc raspberrypi

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