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WebSDR on Raspberry Pi
radio : by Tommy - August 10th 2015, 05:12PM
radio
In Fall 2014, I setup my first Raspberry Pi WebSDR receiver for the 40m amateur radio band. In late July 2015, the Raspberry Pi stopped working at all. Once I hooked a monitor up to it, I learned the SD card had been corrupted. I'm now in the process of rebuilding the receiver and will be updating the steps required to setup this project on my project page.
The receiver hardware itself is fine and operational, it is only the WebSDR host (Raspberry Pi) that is out of commission.

For now the WebSDR and ISS iGate must connect to my home network via a wireless link from my ham shack behind my house. I'm in the process of digging a trench to run a network connection out to the shack so I don't have to wrestle with spotty wifi coverage. I'm going to be running fiber optic for the main run for reason I'll explain that in an upcoming post.

tags: raspberrypi ham radio raspi linux

( Comments : 0 | Full article )

 
HOWTO: Configure Hamlib for Linux Hams - Part 2
radio : by Tommy - December 3rd 2013, 06:48PM
radio
This is a continuation of a two part series about how to configure hamlib for Linux ham radio users.
To get started, be sure to read through Part 1.

In the last post, I pointed out that hamlib was create to simplify the once fragmented world of computer control for amateur radio. With hamlib in place, developers can interact with hamlib which serves as an abstraction layer of sorts for software development. Developers don't need to worry that you're running a particular model of radio, so long as you get your radio working with hamlib, your radio is supported.
I'm going to assume you have /dev/radio and /dev/rotator already configured (since we did that in the previous post). Now, we're going to configure the daemons (servers) that allow a myriad of radio related applications to interact with your amateur radio equipment.

Daemons
Hamlib centers around two core daemons: rigctld and rotctld. The daemons receive commands from applications via TCP. It is possible to have these daemons controlled via the network if you so wish. That functionality is a bit beyond the scope of this article, but the concepts below are exactly the same and just requires the correct ports be opened. Speaking of ports, rigctld and rotctld use ports 4532 and 4533, respectively. Also note that there is no security built into these devices. Should you need external connectivity, you should create an SSH tunnel.

Find your equipment
The first step in configuring rigctld is to find if your particular radio (and rotator for rotctld) is supported. Here is a list of all supported radios for rigctld (chances are, if it's a modern radio with computer interface, it's supported). For rotctld, things get a little more difficult. In order to see if your rotator controller is supported, you need to identify which protocol is supported.

Continue reading...

tags: ham radio hamlib linux satellite

( Comments : 1 | Full article )

 
HOWTO: Configure Hamlib for Linux Hams - Part 1
radio : by Tommy - December 2nd 2013, 8:11PM
radio
Linux and ham radio, where two of the geek worlds collide. Fortunately, with so many geeks involved in both pursuits, a lot of great tools have emerged. Unfortunately, documentation on how to configure some of it was hard to come by. (At least, it seemed that way to me.) Here, I hope to layout as quickly and easily as possible the steps required for other hams to configure hamlib on their linux computers. I'm going to assume you're running a modern version of linux and have a USB connection to your radio and/or rotator.

What is Hamlib?
First of all, Hamlib is a set of ham radio control libraries that allows amateur radio operators to control their radio and antenna rotators via their computer. Hamlib abstracts many device-specific control issues from application developers, allowing for a more robust user experience across several programs. Prior to hamlib, there were several different tools and libraries. None of these tools provided a common API for programmers to interface. As a result, the application landscape was fragmented and functionality suffered. Now, with hamlib, programmers can utilize hamlib to interact with a whole range of devices.

Interface
To use hamlib, you must first have a computer interface cable from your radio to your computer. Without this, everything else here is pretty useless. If you don't have a cable yet, look on eBay for cables tailored to your radio. (It's where I found mine.)
My radio is a Yaesu FT-847 which has a DB9 serial port for CAT computer control. To interface with my computer, I use a cheap USB-to-serial adapter - nothing special. My antenna rotator is a Yaesu FT-5500 with the brilliantly simple WA8SME Satellite Tracker Interface from the ARRL.

USB, Linux and udev
Most modern distributions of Linux include a subsystem to handle when USB devices are inserted.

Continue reading...

tags: ham radio hamlib linux satellite

( Comments : 0 | Full article )

 
ZipIt Z2 Linux
linux : by Tommy - October 9th 2009, 11:29PM
linux
Well, after almost a year of putting off, I finally installed linux on my ZipIt Z2. Jennifer's brother-in-law gave it to me last year right before Christmas. He received one free as part of a promotion and handed it off to me to tinker with. The big problem for me was finding a miniSD card. microSD cards can be found alot more easily (and cheaper) than the miniSD. I was able to snag a miniSD from some retailer on pricewatch. (i know, remember that place?!)

So my 2Gb miniSD finally came in the other day and I'm all set. Lo and behold HunterDavis posted a new tutorial using a Windows machine. I figured I'd give his tutorial a try and found the whole process to be fairly straight foreward. Hats off to HunterDavis and others that paved the way for this.

After following Hunters tutorial to the tee, I was ready to connect to my network, I followed dhenke's tutorial to get a feel for the small keyboard's "hidden" keystrokes (and to dust off and refresh my wpa_supplicant config skills).

I hope to get a NES emulator running on this, that's been my end goal all along and I doubt I do anything more than that with this. But seriously, Tecmo Super Bowl or Legend of Zelda in my pocket/backpack?! Yes, please.

tags: zipit linux

( Comments : 2 | Full article )

 

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